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Young demo sceners?

category: general [glöplog]
'00, one-man demogroup. Just released my first demo, remote submitted to Outline '18. I've decided to use TI-BASIC (and z80ASM, but only when absolutely needed) as a bit of a challenge for myself and because no TI-BASIC demos really exist.

Never been to a demoparty, mainly due to being American and having a distinct lack of money. ;-;
added on the 2018-05-02 16:37:16 by Parzival Parzival
i feel like this a way to catch the underage and ban them
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Never been to a demoparty, mainly due to being American and having a distinct lack of money. ;-;


Yeah, welcome! Try to make the American demo scene great again ;) .. demo making is obviously completely dominated by Europe, don't know why, maybe cause Americans don't waste their time with useless electronic art but earn money with their skills #google #facebook :)
'dec 98 here, first non-party release in '13 (first partyprod in '14), first visited part#$#$@OH SHI~,
CSP'17 doesn't count, as there wasn't much compos, only non-stop boozing (not participiated though :)
added on the 2018-05-03 12:47:59 by wbc\\bz7 wbc\\bz7
I think this raises a valid question. Scenes are defined by their audience. The truth is that the older we get (i'm 40), the more our parties are going to look like 'boring old men with beards playing with outdated hardware' and therefore not really be attractive to the younger crowds.

I mean, if 15 yo me was alive today, he'd be rather concerned that he wouldn't have anyone else to relate to at any given event. There's something really imposing being in a room full of 30-40 yo at that age. And don't get me started about what parent's reaction would have been.

I'm not sure if anything needs to be 'done' though. Reality is, if the young whippersnappers want events, adam smith will do the walking (see: dreamhack). The problem of course is that these events are not as friendly as parties like revision (theft is common for example) and give a bad image of the scene to the 'youngsters'. Maybe online is going to be the way to go for most of them.

Shame because i bet there is an awesome amount of talent in that age group waiting to be uncovered!
added on the 2018-05-03 13:07:25 by DS&B DS&B
Wow, some of the peeps in here could be my kids (I was born in 1983).
added on the 2018-05-03 15:24:19 by Adok Adok
the young sceners have luck, they face a quite professional scene & events, I remember early 90ies parties, just kids and we all know how they and most events sucked ;) .. but the downside is it's much harder to compete after 30 years of experience (with most of old sceners especially if they are today IT engineers that code for fun; not like me, I'm just a interested layman out of competition)
The 30-40 year-old scener average isn't as much concern for me (i'm an Aspie, I mentally bounce around between being 8 and 80), the main concern is acceptance. Most people are well-established here, and I have a hard time with low-level languages. Plus, i'm not as imaginative compared to most.
added on the 2018-05-04 16:06:04 by Parzival Parzival
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Most people are well-established here, and I have a hard time with low-level languages.

That's just the thing though, the word itself is the solution - "well-established" means the people around have spent a lot of time on this, and while it creates a certain distance, it also means they're well aware how it was once to be way behind the curve, so they'll understand as well. Being established just takes work.
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the young sceners have luck, they face a quite professional scene & events, I remember early 90ies parties, just kids and we all know how they and most events sucked ;)

I've been thinking about that too, how the current events, as rowdy as they are, are also shockingly family-friendly, which is nice :)
added on the 2018-05-04 16:17:26 by Gargaj Gargaj
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That's just the thing though, the word itself is the solution - "well-established" means the people around have spent a lot of time on this, and while it creates a certain distance, it also means they're well aware how it was once to be way behind the curve, so they'll understand as well.
That's true. Popularity would put some pressure to really deliver on me as well, which (if i'm honest) I don't really need. Lots of life stuff happening.
added on the 2018-05-04 16:22:26 by Parzival Parzival
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... and I have a hard time with low-level languages. Plus, i'm not as imaginative compared to most.


but it's much easier today to start the scener career - unlimited resources in the internet about coding, hacks and tricks with howtos and demos to get inspiration from + unlimited targets compared to the late 80ies/early 90ies when it was pain in the ass to get a good books about hardware and programming .. think about the development for c64 or Amiga with all the dirty tricks how to get the most out of the machines, today just Google for a tutorial and one of the zillions dev tools and you're ready to start - but as in any business this rises the pressure of competition, so it's today not sufficient to show some copper bars to earn fame
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it's today not sufficient to show some copper bars to earn fame

I've noticed that, yes... it seems to almost be required to break new ground in new demos for any recognition.
added on the 2018-05-07 03:55:17 by Parzival Parzival
Don't feel discouraged, we have just touched the surface ! (tip: it's not so much about shaders but more about your own personal style)
added on the 2018-05-07 04:08:16 by bsp bsp
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I've noticed that, yes... it seems to almost be required to break new ground in new demos for any recognition.


not really .. it's as in sports - if you want to be the best, you have to break records, but there are so many good athletes that are "just" good and get the desired recognition .. so don't focus on ground breaking stuff but try to show some respectable trade, even if it's just the thousandth repetition of well known effects
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it's today not sufficient to show some copper bars to earn fame

I've noticed that, yes... it seems to almost be required to break new ground in new demos for any recognition.

I think that's a very pessimistic view; and it's a lot more true to the attitudes of the past than to current times - naturally when computer capacity was still comprehensible, it was easier to be technically groundbreaking. Nowadays I think it's actually easier to stand out because you have artistic means to do so; your demo can be easily recognized if it looks good or looks strange or delivers something interesting, even if it's technically not amazing. It's easy to confuse "groundbreaking" with "outstanding", but the two aren't actually the same :)
added on the 2018-05-07 12:50:52 by Gargaj Gargaj
'93, first (& currently only) party was Revision 2018
added on the 2018-05-07 20:43:26 by yx yx
'76. too young for amiga, too old for 386'...
added on the 2018-05-09 21:36:28 by aqu aqu
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It's easy to confuse "groundbreaking" with "outstanding", but the two aren't actually the same :)

this. develop your own style, and push it within your own skillset. you can do awesome stuff with very limited technical knowledge too!

these days i value great ideas executed in a simple way more than yet another technically hard to do (perhaps), but boring and ugly fractal thing (for example). especially when it comes from new people who didnt spend 30 years on tweaking their code already.
added on the 2018-05-10 02:25:47 by groepaz groepaz
Wow, a friendly and noteworthy advise to newcomers coming from groepaz.
I have a lonely tear in my eye now ;).
added on the 2018-05-10 03:03:55 by wysiwtf wysiwtf
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'76. too young for amiga, too old for 386'...


that's why I've chosen 286er ;)
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Wow, a friendly and noteworthy advise to newcomers coming from groepaz.
I have a lonely tear in my eye now ;).

and it isnt even advice to newcomers only. and it *especially* applies to old school platforms (to me at least). i am no more impressed by ugly crap that has all borders open. yeah sure, this was once hard to do. so what. its still ugly and non creative.

what seriously turns me on is stuff like this. fuck yeah!

don't aim to win the compo - you will be disappointed. aim to make stuff that will be remembered because its cool in some way or another. the compo winning will come after a couple of iterations :)
added on the 2018-05-11 01:55:46 by groepaz groepaz
'98, my first remote entry was Chaos Constructions '15, first IRL attendance was Silly Venture 2016.

idk I love the scene alright
also amiga suxxxxxxx
added on the 2018-05-11 08:24:25 by Zlew Zlew
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don't aim to win the compo - you will be disappointed. aim to make stuff that will be remembered because its cool in some way or another. the compo winning will come after a couple of iterations :)


I would say, don't aim anything .. just do it for fun, try to realize an idea, try to master technical challenges .. maybe you'll never release something special or never win compo .. that's live, just have fun with what you do ..
Can you all stop calling younger sceners kids please? The correct term is demisceners.
added on the 2018-05-12 08:20:33 by psonice psonice
Thanks for the encouragement, guys... it means a lot. Now if only I could get this friggin' interlace part working...
added on the 2018-05-15 01:49:25 by Parzival Parzival

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