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learning OpenGL

category: code [glöplog]
thank you inigo for those links :)
added on the 2012-10-03 00:58:09 by mudlord mudlord
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I'm thinking about learning OpenGL :P
[...]
which tutorials should I read first?

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Also, read ryg's trip through the graphics pipeline.

Seriously... ryg's series of articles is just plain awesome, but come on, don't you think it's a little bit inappropriate when the original question was "which tutorial should I read first?"?
added on the 2012-10-03 04:56:31 by Zavie Zavie
Btw. anyone is using glm in demo related projects? many tutorials ease the work by using it...
added on the 2012-10-03 08:52:02 by maq maq
I've been thinking of swapping my own math for glm.
added on the 2012-10-03 10:10:30 by Preacher Preacher
maqFLP, yes I'm using GLM. Only plugged it in recently though, but it does make life a lot easier in many ways :)
added on the 2012-10-03 10:10:37 by raizor raizor
GLM is awesome.
added on the 2012-10-03 10:17:40 by pommak pommak
Another up for GLM.
added on the 2012-10-03 10:20:11 by ferris ferris
What raizor_, pommak and Ferris said
added on the 2012-10-03 11:10:50 by provod provod
I've learned OpenGL ES 2.0 first and then moving on to its bigger brother: OpenGL 3.3 was a breeze.
My learning resources were OpenGL ES 2.0 Programming Guide and nice examples from the PowerVR SDK.
thanks guys :)
and one more question - which compiler should I use? I'm installing Visual C++ 6.0 Right now....
added on the 2012-10-04 02:33:42 by zorke zorke
and which math concepts should I master before setting out on such a trip? .... I'm currently 14 and doing grade 9/10 math...... stuff like sine/cos?
added on the 2012-10-04 02:37:01 by zorke zorke
If you still wanna do cracktros, sine and cosine are indeed your friends.
Some basic matrix/vector math wouldnt go astray either, especially with new OGL.

though, nothing is stopping you still using software buffers, and using OpenGL just as a blitter (to avoid your GDI problems).
added on the 2012-10-04 02:53:33 by mudlord mudlord
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Visual C++ 6.0

Too old. There's free "express" versions of all recent Visual Studio versions. Especially VS2010 (English ISO with all versions here) improved the usability a lot imo. Optimization possibilities are not as good as in the full versions, but that shouldn't matter much...
Haven't tried the new VS2012 though.

You might need some recent OpenGL headers if you're using advanced functions.
added on the 2012-10-04 09:40:09 by raer raer
For math there's also Eigen which is not GLSL-like, but is also header-only and has some advanced features.
added on the 2012-10-04 10:03:27 by raer raer
VS2012 is quite nice once you get over the slightly more washed out colour scheme. You should be fine with the express edition of VS2010 or 2012, at least in the short term.

In terms of mastering maths beforehand, I'd personally come up with some idea of what you're looking to achieve (what effects etc), and then pick up the necessary maths needed for those as you go. I find this approach has worked well for me, as you learn as you go rather than trying to cram a million new things into your mind without any idea of what to apply them to.
added on the 2012-10-04 10:43:23 by raizor raizor
VS2012 all the way. As for the color scheme, it DOES also come with a dark theme that looks rather sexy :)
added on the 2012-10-04 11:13:54 by ferris ferris
Also, VS2012 Express (for Desktop) can do C++11, 64bit, plugins, finally has C++ and C# in the same package, etc etc. The only thing I'm really missing with Express is all the new DirectX integration/debugging but it shouldn't bother you and your rather questionable choice of graphics API :P
added on the 2012-10-04 11:46:30 by kb_ kb_
Seriously tho, OpenGL is definitely the right choice for learning about 3D programming. Just don't stick with the basics for too long and switch over to shaders/VBOs/FBOs as soon as you feel you get what they do. You can do so much more stuff with the training wheels off (unless other people who think "what works, works" is an excuse for this).
added on the 2012-10-04 12:01:42 by kb_ kb_
[quote=kb_]Also, VS2012 Express (for Desktop) can do C++11, 64bit, plugins, finally has C++ and C# in the same package, etc etc. The only thing I'm really missing with Express is all the new DirectX integration/debugging but it shouldn't bother you and your rather questionable choice of graphics API :P[/quote]

I assume KB stands for KotzBroken ;)

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...(unless other people who think "what works, works" is an excuse for this).


I retract my previous statement. KB stands for KeinBlattvordenmund :D
added on the 2012-10-04 12:06:33 by Danzig Danzig
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Just don't stick with the basics for too long and switch over to shaders/VBOs/FBOs as soon as you feel you get what they do.
nice thing is, when you make the switch, there's actually LOADS less to remember when you actually DO stuff.
added on the 2012-10-04 13:15:05 by ferris ferris
Oh, and most important VS2012 tip of all: set HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\11.0\General\SuppressUppercase Conversion to 1 (DWORD)
added on the 2012-10-04 13:57:41 by kb_ kb_
oh so THATS how you turn that off. thx.
added on the 2012-10-04 14:32:30 by Gargaj Gargaj
the free "VSCommands for VS 2012" has this option + some useful others, they say.
added on the 2012-10-04 14:44:30 by Danzig Danzig
@Danzig: Can VS2012 Express use plugins? I thought the free versions had them disabled.
added on the 2012-10-04 17:28:12 by Subi Subi
@Subi: AFAIK they are still disabled for 2012 Express Editions, too. I just found that info about VSCommands while searching for the reg key KB posted. I haven't seen VS2012 yet and didn't knew about that MENU PROBLEM :D And I just wanted to share the info with the kind people here at pouët ;)
added on the 2012-10-04 22:01:20 by Danzig Danzig

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