pouët.net

Go to bottom

Use of UE et cetera

category: general [glöplog]
oh how i wish someone had came up with the idea of adding a compo rule "mandatory display of demotool's name (if any used) on the beamer, votesystem, infofile and the product itself"..... but then again it would just make things too simple i guess.

yes, definitely add separate compos for those! we can probably break them down further into "demos with a blue logo" and "demos with a non-blue logo" or something
added on the 2018-08-12 18:18:52 by nagz nagz
Mandatory display of underwear and manboobs. I'm sure that would affect voting!!
added on the 2018-08-12 18:21:39 by yzi yzi
Quote:
yes, definitely add separate compos for those! we can probably break them down further into "demos with a blue logo" and "demos with a non-blue logo" or something
I'd definitely dominate the non-blue logo category btw! If only it existed :---(

I'd still like the engine to be displayed but I guess it's just going to be the other way around; people who care will tell about their custom stuff on the compo slides. That's okay too, I'll just assume UE/Notch for everything else.
added on the 2018-08-12 18:26:58 by msqrt msqrt
Quote:
mandatory display of demotool's name

How much code can be reused from a previous prod before it counts as a demotool? How do you measure it? Lines of code? Compiled size?
added on the 2018-08-12 18:32:11 by absence absence
i leave this fine-tuning up to people who are more tech-oriented (ie. coders)
added on the 2018-08-12 18:35:09 by nagz nagz
It should be enough if it looks like it was made with a paint program of some sort.
added on the 2018-08-12 18:38:09 by yzi yzi
Quote:
Isn't what you just said an argument for making a separate compo for UE/Unity? As those are way more than OpenGL subsets?

No, I just said that there's no segregation between browser and non-browser demo compos.
added on the 2018-08-12 19:22:24 by Gargaj Gargaj
@Gargaj: no one's talking about hand coded demos being endangered species. But "having to code" and "not having to code" means very different skillsets.

If for some reason UE demos get popular and numerous someday, splitting up the demo compo might make sense. That's not the case right now. Until then, I just wish that properly crediting the creators of an engine would be part of demoscene ethics.
added on the 2018-08-12 20:59:01 by jimmi jimmi
Quote:
So you really think taking the whole "democoding" idea and relegating it to an "Endangered Species" compo is ATTRACTIVE? :D


not for me personally, but might be for some people.
added on the 2018-08-12 21:39:12 by psenough psenough
Quote:
yzi, T$: I see you are bored, but me too, so yeah.. if you think about it deep enough, you can get into conclusion that any trick/algorithm worth doing with current hw will eventually end-up being implemented in those massive engines (UE/Unity), because economy. Also, because economy, it will most likely be implemented in commercial engines first, that is, before it will appear on the demoscene. So in short, resistance is futile.


So... which commercial engine implemented brute force raymarching so far?
added on the 2018-08-12 22:27:10 by T$ T$
I bet most of them do it for volumetrics
added on the 2018-08-12 22:59:40 by msqrt msqrt
T$: notice that I've said "any trick/algorithm worth doing". As much as I like raymarching and it's fun to do it in demoscene project, I don't think it's (for majority of gamers) a practical algorithm that is worth doing if you want 60fps+.

And that's the thing - actually demoscene could stand-out by trying techniques that are otherwise impractical (or not yet practical) e.g. real-time ray-tracing with full scene GI (like in this Project PICA PICA), some new ray-marching tricks (like in 4k One of those days), real-time iso-surface extraction (like in 64k Uncovering static), crazy point-cloud rendering (like Ceasefire, but also many others).
The thing is, even those exotic rendering techniques might have commercial value and big companies recognized that there is a value investing in innovation like this (like this SEED/Project PICA PICA). That kind of makes it harder for a good coder to find motivation to spend a lot of time and 'compete' with big companies in his spare time on a demoscene that is not even especially interested in this, when he can simply get paid for it.
added on the 2018-08-12 23:37:35 by tomkh tomkh
It's actually way more effective to do something impressive on ShaderToy these days. You will probably also get more exposure from it in the coder's community. So yeah, in a long run demoscene might become yet another engine-modding community.
added on the 2018-08-12 23:41:23 by tomkh tomkh
this year's Assembly pc demo, 64k and 4k categories were unanimously won by D3DCompiler_47.dll
I wasn't implying (on previous page) that not using an engine was an excuse to do something non-mind-blowing, just that demos using a comprehensive engine should go over & above...
added on the 2018-08-13 00:40:21 by bloodnok bloodnok
tomkh: good. so let´s just focus on copperbars and ribbons and demoscene should be safe.
added on the 2018-08-13 01:09:26 by T$ T$
Weyland Yutani: of course you are right, 4k was always a gimmick and excercise in using API that takes as less lines of code to render something cool (note: 4k in Vulcan discussion).

T$: I would say demoscene is safe, as long as it is a sport with clear rules.
added on the 2018-08-13 08:33:48 by tomkh tomkh
Quote:
this year's Assembly pc demo, 64k and 4k categories were unanimously won by D3DCompiler_47.dll


Instant win!
added on the 2018-08-13 09:27:54 by leijaa leijaa

login

Go to top